Jeffery Luhn

Mr.  Jeffery Luhn

Jeffery Luhn began his career as a small town newspaper photojournalist and wedding photographer at age 15 in Hayward, CA. He earned a 2-year degree in Industrial/Scientific Photography at Laney College in Oakland and was hired by United Press International to photograph the ‘Hippie Invasion of Europe”. The photos were used by Time, Life, Newsweek, and many newspapers around the world. At the time he began his career, Jeffery was the youngest photographer ever hired by a national news organization. 

 

At age 20 Jeffery was hired to create and manage the photography department for Alameda County Photography. In this capacity he trained 100 police officers and district attorney inspectors to use cameras in the collection of evidence at crime scenes. He worked on the consolidation of many high profile cases including the Patty Hearst kidnapping, the SLA capture, and others.

 

Jeffery went on to earn two Bachelor of Arts degrees from Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, a California College Teaching Credential, and numerous awards from Professional Photographers of America. Midway in his career, after years of shooting hard breaking news assignments in Asia, Central America and Europe, Jeffery focused his efforts on the advertising field.

 

His studio in San Francisco (Visioneering) employed seven photographers. Visioneering maintained associate studios in Hong Kong and New York to service a growing list of clients. He has shot commercial video and stills in over 20 countries for Apple, Microsoft, General Motors, Pixar, and other large companies.

 

Jeffery taught his first college level photography courses in 1981. He currently lists teaching as his main profession and works as an instructor at Cabrillo College and Columbia College. Jeffery also gives lectures on photography and history on various cruise ship lines.


 

 

 


About

 

 

Course Number:  ART 43 - 4061 and ART 340 - 4062

Department: ART

Course Title ART 43: Introduction to Digital Photography

Course Title ART 340: Creative Photography

Submitted by: Jeffery Jay Luhn     LuhnJ@yosemite.edu

© 2020 Jeffery Jay Luhn  All Rights Reserved

 

Description:

Introduction to digital photography through the disciplines of technical camera handling, use of natural and artificial lighting, composition, and basic image processing with the goal of producing high quality photos for fine art and commercial purposes.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

Art 43 Not repeatable. Transfer: (CSU/UC)

Art 340 for non-credit is repeatable.

 

Units and hours:

This is a 3-unit course. The hours are assigned as follows:

Weekly 2-hour lecture         36 hours

Weekly 3-hour lab                54hours

Out-of-class hours                 72 hours

Total hours                            162

 

Important Dates
Refund Date: 09/06/2020
Drop without 'W' Date: 09/07/2020
Pass No Pass Date: 09/22/2020
Last Day to Drop Date: 11/12/2020

Final project due: 12/9/2020

 

Requirements:

1-    Students must own a Digital camera with manual mode, i.e. capable of setting all functions manually.

2-    Students will be required to purchase a set of close-up filters. Details describing this accessory will be given out in class. Estimated cost: $15

3-    Students will be required to own a flashlight. Estimated cost $15

4-    Students will be required to own a reflector. Approximate size 24”x36” Cardboard covered with white paper will do. Estimated cost $2

5-    Students must have access to a computer with an internet connection.

6-    There is no text required for this course.

 

Learning Objectives

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:

• Operate a digital camera by utilizing all of the critical controls and menu items for desired effect.

• Successfully complete the camera handling and artistic assignments in order to demonstrate a level of competency required to perform commercial tasks.

• Analyze photographs and other artworks with a critical eye, thereby benefiting from their technique, concept, and content.

• Learn the process of improvement by applying critical thinking skills gained in assignments, group critique sessions and self-evaluation.

• Gain an understanding of how photographic abilities can be integrated into student skill sets for personal enrichment and employment.

• Display competency in the direction of human subjects, placement of inanimate objects, and selection of various camera angles to achieve unique images.

• Insure that students understand basic lighting properties and principles

 

Student Evaluation

Evaluation will be divided on the following criteria:

60% Assignment submissions

10% Participation in class discussions and lab activities

30% Submission of final portfolio

 

Student Learning Outcomes

• Recognize specific attributes of photographs and be able to identify and duplicate the techniques required to achieve similar results.

• Demonstrate an understanding of the various qualities of light including color temperature, direct and diffused lighting, and the ways to control the light with modifiers.

• Capture high quality images of action such as sports, weddings, general events, wildlife, performances and other one-time occurrences with reliable and repeatable results.

• Accomplish the role of photographer for group and personal projects including, but not limited to, website development, catalog shooting, architectural images, portraits, journalism, general documentation, and artistic expression.

 

Course Content Overview

•Study and use of digital photographic tools including in-depth camera operation for the controlled capture of images under various lighting and environmental conditions.

• Mastering the effects of camera controls on depth-of-field, interpretation of moving subjects through shutter speeds, color balance, and image quality.

• Achieving properly exposed images through the process of exposure control, image review, and immediate reshooting for desired effect.

• Familiarization of camera optics and the role they play in altering perspective, subject magnification, and practical usage.

• Application of design and composition principles involving camera angle and subject placement, in both natural and controlled environments.

• Historical and current trends, language, aesthetics and the use of photography in emerging media.

• Evaluation and critique of photographic images utilizing relevant terminology and concepts.

• Being able to present student work and explain the methods used as they apply to the assignments. 

• Achieving a professional level of self-evaluation and acceptance of outside critique to promote a life-long process of improving the quality of work. 

Course Rubric

Week 1 – Covering the syllabus, discussing expected student outcomes, discussing workload management, submission methods, and equipment requirements. Introduction to PowerPoint software and the Canvas platform.

Week 2 – Overview of the camera functions. We cover the navigation and access to your cameras BASIC menus and controls. I discuss and demonstrate the difference between DIRECT SUNLIGHT and OPEN SHADE. Students shoot examples during class.

Week 3 – Understanding what aperture, shutter and ISO settings are and how they work together to achieve exposure. This week we introduce the effects of various shutter speeds on moving subjects. Students shoot examples during class.

Week 4 – Further study of camera modes with special emphasis on Aperture. Students will shoot a specific subject using a range of apertures to display the differences in depth of field.  Shots to be done in class.Week 5 – We use and compare the following modes: Portrait, Night Portrait, Night Scenery, Action and Manual. Students shoot examples during class.Week 6 – Composition – an overview. We examine the rule of thirds and the Fibonacci Grid. Patterns, Symmetry, and Asymmetry are discussed and demonstrated. Students are directed to change their camera option so the grid appears in the finder. Students shoot examples during class.Week 7 – Introduction to Macro Photography and Associated Lighting Solutions. Using the close-up filters that we purchased, we will be taking several close-ups with each of the 4 diopters. We will be adding light with our flashlights to see the effects of controlled illumination on close up subjects

Week 8- Exploration of Lighting Properties

Expanding on the concept of hard and soft light, this lecture delves into lighting choice and control. Students will shoot examples during class.

Week 9- Basic Portrait Lighting Patterns

This week we learn the 5 basic portrait lighting patterns used by all studios and movie lighting directors. Portraiture remains one of the few areas that commercial photographers can still make a living.

Week 10- Application of Portrait Concepts

Expanding upon the 5 basic lighting patterns, we add a RIM LIGHT to the lighting scheme. The work of Josef Karsh will be viewed and discussed.

Week 11- Landscape Photography

This lecture will cover the history of landscape photography and it’s role in the documentation of the growth of industrialized America and the rise of the environmental movement. Special emphasis on the beauty of landscape photography achieved by Ansel Adams and other greats.

Week 12- Light Painting

This technique is very useful for getting studio quality photos of objects by using a simple flashlight. Many students have said this was their favorite topic of the course. It’s certainly fun! 

Week 13- Architectural Photography

Architectural photography is often used in websites, tutorials, and for commercial purposes. The work of Julius Shulman will be viewed and discussed.

Week 14- No Class  Thanksgiving Holiday

Week 15- Portfolio showing by students

Students will show their completed portfolios in class.

 

College Policies

Academic dishonesty, plagiarism, and behavior.

Columbia College maintains a high standard of individual student academic achievement by strictly enforcing the rules against modes of disruptive conduct, plagiarizing the work of others, dishonesty, stealing, collusion to commit acts of academic crimes such as doing work for others outside of the bounds of group assignments, selling or trading work with other students for the benefit of grading, treating fellow students in a disrespectful manner or any other action that makes others uncomfortable.

 

Unacceptable behavior also includes eating in class, dominating classroom discussions, failure to respect the rights of others to participate in class activities or express themselves, talking in class during lectures, inattentiveness such as using the computer or a cell phone for unrelated tasks during lectures, excessive demands for attention of teacher’s time for the review of material covered in class, and any other behavior that impedes the progress of the class.

 

In the process of learning the craft of photography, there is an acceptable range of copying techniques and shot content that would be plagiarism in the workplace, but is acceptable learning behavior in the context of the classroom. Any questions concerning these topics should be discussed with the instructor for clarification.

 

We strive to provide a welcoming and safe learning environment for all students. If you feel that you are the victim of any improper or coercive behavior by a teacher or student you should report the actions to school authorities at once. Silence does not help to build a healthy environment.

 

Absences

Participation in class lectures and labs is a significant portion of the grade. While a student may benefit from viewing the online materials associated with the class and complete many of the assignments while missing class meetings, frequent absences will be grounds for dropping a student. This course of study involves many hands-on tasks that need to be supervised by the instructor for the best outcome. If a student is unable to attend several classes due to illness or personal reasons, he/she should contact the instructor to discuss the situation.

 

Class progress and pacing

The class is designed to progress at a steady pace, allowing for every student that applies him/herself to stay current. As in the case of all skills, each exercise builds upon the previous one in order to achieve mastery. If a student misses a class or fails to complete the required assignment in sequence, the result will be a failure to achieve the goals of the student learning outcome (SLO).  I will work with students in the final lab hour to support them in their efforts to catch up with assignments or review concepts and previous lessons. It is my job to help all students to get the maximum benefit from the course, but instructors are not able or required to supply students with an unreasonable level of assistance. Students are expected to apply themselves, attend class, and do their best to complete the work. Effort is a key component of learning and it will be rewarded in this course, and in life!

 

Class assignments

Under normal conditions without a pandemic in progress, we’d do the class assignments involving technical skills in the lab face-to-face following the lecture. Because of our limitations, I will schedule a time for Zoom meetings to be conducted while students do assignments at home. These meetings will be scheduled as needed. NOTE: ANY ASSIGNMENT MAY BE REDONE FOR A HIGHER GRADE UP UNTIL WEEK 15 OF THE CLASS. I encourage redos.

 

Submission of student work

It is important for students to submit photos in a digital file format that can be easily viewed by the instructor and fellow students through Zoom. It is equally important for the photo files to be properly labeled with the assignment name to prevent confusion or excessive time needed to sort them out. The preferred format is JPEG sized to about 1 megabyte and placed into a PowerPoint slide show.

 

Late assignments

Each assignment is due 6 days after it is given, although earlier submissions are welcome because they are useful in the class critiques. Assignments that are turned in late will be lowered a full grade point. In the business world, a late photo that misses the deadline is often rejected and unpaid. This is particularly true in the production of printed materials. In the digital world, a mediocre submission can be updated. Such is the case in this class. It is better to submit the photo exercises from a lab session than suffer the consequences of a late assignment. Any assignment can be redone for an A up until week 15, but a late assignment can only be raised to a B.

 

Grading system

Most assignments require two or more photo submissions. The value of each photo is typically between 5 and 10 points unless specified otherwise. If the photos for a 40-point assignment are done during the lab with a satisfactory result, which displays an understanding of the technique or concept, but lacks creativity, the grade will typically be 31 points, equaling 77%. That’s a C+. Higher points are possible with a proper application of the technique and a unique approach to the design, composition and/or content. Clever and unique approaches to an assignment, especially when the work is done on the student’s time outside of the lab, are rewarded with higher marks.

 

 

Final Portfolio

The hard and fast rules about portfolio content are as follows:

• Final portfolio submissions are due no later than class meeting on WEEK 15.

• Due to time constraints on the last class meeting your portfolio may not be shown, so I encourage early submissions to gain the benefit of class critique and discussion.

• No less than 10 photos and no more than 20.

• Photos should not exceed 3 megabytes each and may be as small as 600KB.

• All portfolio shots must be inserted into a 9 x 16 ratio horizontal frame. Vertical shots are welcome. Excess space on all images not fitting the frame, including vertical photos, should be filled with black.

• Each submitted photo should have © Date and Name in a lower corner.

• Portfolio content is solely at the discretion of the student, as long as it does not contain nudity or objectionable subject matter. Discussion of portfolio content with the instructor is required to prevent any misunderstandings.

• Use the portfolio as a way to apply your acquired skills toward your area of interest.

• No more than 3 images previously submitted as assignments will be accepted as part of your portfolio 


                 Digital Photography ART 49 has been updated Jan. 11, 2021

---------

ART 49 Intermediate Digital Photography

 

Description:

3 units Recommended for Success: ART 45 or equivalent.

36 Lecture Hours, 54 Laboratory Hours, 72 Out-of-Class Hours = 162 Total Student Learning Hours.  This syllabus also covers the non-credit version, ART 340.

 

Prerequisite for this course:

The catalog does not require a prerequisite class for this course, but it does recommend Beginning Digital Photography Art -43 for success in this course.

 

Accommodations needed during the pandemic:

Under normal circumstances, when the campus was not closed by the pandemic, the instructor scheduled additional time to work with students in Art-45 that had not taken Art-43. That approach will continue during this semester.

 

At the time of writing of this revised syllabus there are 18 out of 29 students that have not taken Art-43. The number of students in prior Art-45 classes that had not taken Art-43 did not exceed 10%. 18 out of 29 was cause for the instructor to be quite concerned, alarmed actually, that the material would have to be ‘dumbed down’ to accommodate students without basic camera knowledge.

 

Dumbing down would be unfair to the 10 students that have taken the beginning course and completed the material. Additionally, this course is transferrable to the California State University system and lowering the standards of the course, or deleting material entirely, would be a violation of the core principles of our accreditation.

 

In the first class meeting students will take an evaluation test to determine their level of knowledge.  This test will not influence student grading. It is for the sole purpose of acquainting students with the material covered in Art-43 and informing the instructor of student photographic experience.  

 

The content of this course will remain intact, requiring beginning students to spend about half of the required time of the course on basic principles. The total number of student learning hours required for this course is 162. There have been many past students, by their own choice, that devoted more time than required. There have been many past students that excelled in this course with an investment of fewer hours. No student will find it necessary to spend more than 162 hours to achieve an A in this course.

 

In summary, the expected learning outcomes (ELO) for Art-45 will remain intact. Students that have taken Art-45 before will be pleased to see many updated assignments. Students that have taken Art-43 will be appropriately challenged. If you are one of the 18 students that have not taken Art-43, or taken any course from me, you will have to work hard to achieve a level of competency required to complete the Art-45 assignments. While the learning curve may seem steep at first, be aware that the investment of time on basics will decline as the class progresses.

 

Rest assured you will not be required to complete all the assignments from Art-43. That would be too much work for both instructor and student. Students will be assisted in overcoming the steep learning curve to complete the Art-45 assignments in a satisfactory manner through exposure to selected Art-43 material.

 

It is the goal of this instructor that beginning students will pass this course and be left with a strong desire to take Art-43 when it is offered.

 

Required equipment:

• A digital camera with full manual mode. A DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) is preferred. If you have a question about whether your camera is suitable, please email the instructor at luhnj@yosemite.edu with your camera brand and model number.

• Two strong LED flashlights.

• A piece of white foamcore or white cardboard no smaller than 24” x 36”

• A sturdy tripod with a maximum height of at least 60”

• A computer and reliable internet connection

 

 

Content overview:

We will cover various topics and techniques that use photography to tell a story, control your messaging with powerful visuals, and create mockups of book layouts and web pages. We will discuss the work of photographers, both historic and current, to benefit from their results. Students will learn to develop a personal vision that can be realized through photography.

 

Camera handling techniques are a big part of this course. Students will be reviewing and refining selected techniques covered in the Beginning Digital Photography course, including, but not limited to, depth of field, ISO control, use of shutter speeds and apertures for various effects, lighting principles, portrait posing, composition, photojournalism, and tailoring images for media purposes.

 

Photographic content is of equal importance to camera handling. The two are interdependent. At the very least, students must understand exposure and depth of field basics to get satisfactory results by week two of this course. Very early in the beginning course it was clearly stated that ‘casual snap shots’ were not acceptable. That rule remains in effect in Art-45.

 

Using the camera in AUTO mode is discouraged because the flash often fires at inappropriate times, defeating the control of lighting. Additionally, the AUTO mode makes exposure decisions that are accurate only about half the time. Students are expected to view the provided videos and digest these basic camera-handling concepts right away.

 

Cluttered compositions with disregard to distracting elements in the foreground or background is a topic that was repeatedly covered in the Beginning Class and will result in mandatory reshoots. Students without previous training in composition will be required to view provided video lectures from Art-43.

 

Art-45 is not repeatable for additional credit. Transfer: (CSU)   

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:

• Operate a digital camera by utilizing all of the critical controls and menu items for desired effect.

• Successfully complete the camera handling and artistic assignments in order to demonstrate a level of competency required to perform commercial tasks.

• Learn the basic digital processing skills to be able to retouch, alter color, sharpen, blur, understand layers for combining photo elements, and other tasks. (This is depending upon student access to photo processing software.)

• Be able to format assignments according to course requirements and submit them using Canvas.

• Analyze photographs and other artworks with a critical eye, thereby benefiting from their technique, concept, and content.

• Learn the process of improvement by applying critical thinking skills gained in assignments, group critique sessions and self-evaluation.

• Gain an understanding of how photographic abilities can be integrated into student skill sets for personal enrichment and employment.

• Display competency in the direction of human subjects, placement of inanimate objects, and selection of various camera angles to achieve unique images.

• Insure that students understand basic lighting properties and principles.

 

Student Evaluation

Evaluation will be divided on the following criteria:

60% Assignment submissions

20% Participation in class discussions and lab activities

20% Submission of final portfolio

 

Student Learning Outcomes

• Tolerate and benefit from honest criticism by the instructor and fellow students.

• Ability to deliver honest and well-meaning criticism of the photographic work of others.

• Apply camera handling skills and use of design and composition for the creation of high quality images for artistic and commercial purposes.

• Recognize specific attributes of photographs and be able to identify and duplicate the techniques required to achieve similar results.

• Demonstrate an understanding of the various qualities of light including color temperature, direct and diffused lighting, and the ways to control the light with modifiers.

• Learn the skills necessary to capture high quality images of action such as sports, weddings, general events, wildlife, performances and other one-time occurrences with reliable and repeatable results.

• Use PowerPoint, and Canvas at a level of competency acceptable to employers and web developers.

•Use of Photoshop, when available through in-person labs. (Photoshop usage is encouraged for students that have access to it.)

• Prosecute the role of photographer for group and personal projects including, but not limited to, website development, catalog shooting, architectural images, portraits, journalism, general documentation, and artistic expression.

•Familiarization of historical and current trends, language, aesthetics and the use of photography in emerging media.

• Evaluation and critique of photographic images utilizing relevant terminology and concepts.

• Being able to present student work and explain the methods used as they apply to the assignments. 

• Achieving a professional level of self-evaluation and acceptance of outside critique to promote a life-long process of improving the quality of work. 

 

 

Course content if a relaxation of pandemic restraints is achieved 

•Study and use of digital photographic tools including in-depth camera operation for the controlled capture of images under various lighting and environmental conditions in the studio and outdoor field trips.

• Mastering the effects of camera controls on depth-of-field, interpretation of moving subjects through shutter speeds, color balance, and image manipulation using software processing.

•Familiarization of camera optics and the role they play in altering perspective, subject magnification, and practical usage.

• Application of design and composition principles involving camera angle and subject placement, in both natural and controlled environments.

 

College Policies

Academic dishonesty, plagiarism and behavior.

Columbia College maintains a high standard of individual student academic achievement by strictly enforcing the rules against modes of disruptive conduct, plagiarizing the work of others, dishonesty, stealing, collusion to commit acts of academic crimes such as doing work for others outside of the bounds of group assignments, selling or trading work with other students for the benefit of grading, treating fellow students in a disrespectful manner or any other action that makes others uncomfortable.

 

Unacceptable behavior also includes eating in class, dominating classroom discussions, failure to respect the rights of others to participate in class activities or express themselves, talking in class during lectures, inattentiveness such as using the computer or a cell phone for unrelated tasks during lectures, excessive demands for attention of teacher’s time for the review of material covered in class, and any other behavior that impedes the progress of the class.

 

In the process of learning the craft of photography, there is an acceptable range of copying techniques and shot content that would be plagiarism in the workplace, but is acceptable learning behavior in the context of the classroom. Any questions concerning these topics should be discussed with the instructor for clarification.

 

We strive to provide a welcoming and safe learning environment for all students. If you feel that you are the victim of any improper or coercive behavior by a teacher or student you should report the actions to school authorities at once. Silence does not help to build a healthy environment.

 

Absences

Participation in class lectures and labs is a significant portion of the grade. While a student may benefit from viewing the online materials associated with the class and complete many of the assignments while missing class meetings, frequent absences will be grounds for dropping a student. This course of study involves many hands-on tasks that need to be supervised by the instructor for the best outcome. If a student is unable to attend several classes due to illness or personal reasons, he/she should contact the instructor to discuss the situation.

 

Class progress and pacing

The class is designed to progress at a steady pace, allowing for every student that applies him/herself to stay current. As in the case of all skills, each exercise builds upon the previous one in order to achieve mastery. If a student misses a class or fails to complete the required assignment in sequence, the result will be a failure to achieve the goals of the student learning outcome (SLO).  I will work with students in the final lab hour to support them in their efforts to catch up with assignments or review concepts and previous lessons. It is my job to help all students to get the maximum benefit from the course, but instructors are not able or required to supply students with an unreasonable level of assistance. Students are expected to apply themselves, attend class, and do their best to complete the work. Effort is a key component of learning and it will be rewarded in this course, and in life!

 

Class assignments and submission of student work

It is necessary for students to format their photos into PowerPoint presentations and submit them through Canvas so work can be easily viewed by the instructor and shared in class. It is equally important for the photo files to be properly labeled with the assignment name to prevent confusion or excessive time needed to sort them out. The preferred format for individual photos is JPEG sized to about 1 megabyte each and placed into PowerPoint. Even at that reduced size, some assignments contain so many photos that the PowerPoint presentations will not upload quickly or be accepted by Canvas. For this reason, students will be required to save presentations as a PDF when upload is excessively slow or not possible due to poor internet connections.

 

Late assignments

Assignments are due the following week after they are given, unless specified by the instructor. Assignments that are turned in late will be lowered a full grade point. In the business world, a late photo that misses the deadline is often rejected and unpaid. This is particularly true in the production of printed materials. In the digital world, a mediocre submission can be updated. Such is the case in this class. It is better to submit the photo exercises from a lab session than suffer the consequences of a late assignment.

 

Any assignment can be redone for an A up until week 15, but a late assignment can only be raised to a B.

 

Grading system

Most assignments require two or more photos. The value of each photo will vary depending upon difficulty. Points are awarded in accordance with proper application of the techniques and a unique approach to the design, composition and/or content. Clever and unique approaches to an assignment are rewarded with higher marks.

 

There will be opportunities for students to complete extra credit assignments that contribute to higher grades. Extra credit points are added to student totals after their grades are averaged. It is possible to accrue enough extra credit points to achieve a full grade point rise.

 

The instructor does not know the total of all possible points until the semester is almost over because individual assignments are tailored to class achievement, dependent on weather, and altered by other external factors. Students can ‘do the math’ at any time to figure out what their current grade is. Simply divide your accrued points by the total points of all current class assignments ad add your extra credit points. Using that method you’ll come up with a percentage. A is 90% or higher. B is 80 – 89%. C is 70 – 79%. D is 60 – 69%. F is any score lower than 59%.

 

Class dates and withdrawal from class rules

The following document also appears on page four of the current Columbia College Catalog.