Jeffery Luhn

Mr.  Jeffery Luhn

Jeffery Luhn began his career as a small town newspaper photojournalist and wedding photographer at age 15 in Hayward, CA. He earned a 2-year degree in Industrial/Scientific Photography at Laney College in Oakland and was hired by United Press International to photograph the ‘Hippie Invasion of Europe”. The photos were used by Time, Life, Newsweek, and many newspapers around the world. At the time he began his career, Jeffery was the youngest photographer ever hired by a national news organization. 

 

At age 20 Jeffery was hired to create and manage the photography department for Alameda County Photography. In this capacity he trained 100 police officers and district attorney inspectors to use cameras in the collection of evidence at crime scenes. He worked on the consolidation of many high profile cases including the Patty Hearst kidnapping, the SLA capture, and others.

 

Jeffery went on to earn two Bachelor of Arts degrees from Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, a California College Teaching Credential, and numerous awards from Professional Photographers of America. Midway in his career, after years of shooting hard breaking news assignments in Asia, Central America and Europe, Jeffery focused his efforts on the advertising field.

 

His studio in San Francisco (Visioneering) employed seven photographers. Visioneering maintained associate studios in Hong Kong and New York to service a growing list of clients. He has shot commercial video and stills in over 20 countries for Apple, Microsoft, General Motors, Pixar, and other large companies.

 

Jeffery taught his first college level photography courses in 1981. He currently lists teaching as his main profession and works as an instructor at Cabrillo College and Columbia College. Jeffery also gives lectures on photography and history on various cruise ship lines.


 

 

 


About

SYLLABUS


Course Number:  ART 340 3730

Department: ART

Course Title:Introduction to Digital Photography

Submitted by:Jeffery Jay Luhn     Jeff@LuhnPhoto.com

 

Description:

Introduction to digital photography through the disciplines of technical camera handling, use of natural and artificial lighting, composition, and basic image processing with the goal of producing high quality photos for fine art and commercial purposes.

 

Units and hours:

This is a 3-unit course. The hours are assigned as follows:

Weekly 2-hour lecture         36hours

Weekly 3-hour lab                54hours

Out-of-class hours                 72 hours

Total hours                            162

 

Learning Objectives

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:

• Operate a digital camera by utilizing all of the critical controls and menu items for desired effect.

• Successfully complete the camera handling and artistic assignments in order to demonstrate a level of competency required to perform commercial tasks.

• Analyze photographs and other artworks with a critical eye, thereby benefiting from their technique, concept, and content.

• Learn the process of improvement by applying critical thinking skills gained in assignments, group critique sessions and self-evaluation.

• Gain an understanding of how photographic abilities can be integrated into student skill sets for personal enrichment and employment.

• Display competency in the direction of human subjects, placement of inanimate objects, and selection of various camera angles to achieve unique images.

• Insure that students understand basic lighting properties and principles

 

Student Evaluation

Evaluation will be divided on the following criteria:

60% Assignment submissions

20% Participation in class discussions and lab activities

20% Submission of final portfolio

 

Student Learning Outcomes

• Apply camera handling skills and use of design and composition for the creation of high quality images for artistic and commercial purposes.

• Recognize specific attributes of photographs and be able to identify and duplicate the techniques required to achieve similar results.

• Demonstrate an understanding of the various qualities of light including color temperature, direct and diffused lighting, and the ways to control the light with modifiers.

• Capture high quality images of action such as sports, weddings, general events, wildlife, performances and other one-time occurrences with reliable and repeatable results.

• Prosecute the role of photographer for group and personal projects including, but not limited to, website development, catalog shooting, architectural images, portraits, journalism, general documentation, and artistic expression.

 

Course Content Overview

•Study and use of digital photographic tools including in-depth camera operation for the controlled capture of images under various lighting and environmental conditions.

• Mastering the effects of camera controls on depth-of-field, interpretation of moving subjects through shutter speeds, color balance, and image quality.

• Achieving properly exposed images through the process of exposure control, image review, and immediate reshooting for desired effect.

• Familiarization of camera optics and the role they play in altering perspective, subject magnification, and practical usage.

• Application of design and composition principles involving camera angle and subject placement, in both natural and controlled environments.

• Historical and current trends, language, aesthetics and the use of photography in emerging media.

• Evaluation and critique of photographic images utilizing relevant terminology and concepts.

• Being able to present student work and explain the methods used as they apply to the assignments. 

• Achieving a professional level of self-evaluation and acceptance of outside critique to promote a life-long process of improving the quality of work. 

Course Rubric

Week 1 – Covering the syllabus, discussing expected student outcomes, discussing workload management, submission methods and equipment requirements.

Audio visual:

“Intro Lecture” https://youtu.be/Hj0Inwaa7Pc   

“Camera Basics Module 1” https://youtu.be/BsgGjutkqb4  

Assignment: 3 shots - People, Places and things.  3 photos. 1- Head and shoulders portrait of a subject that you will use for a model in future assignments. 2- Photo of a place that you can return to for later work. 3- A photo of an inanimate object or product that you’ll have access to for future assignments.

 

Week 2 – Overview of the camera functions. We cover the navigation and access to your cameras BASIC menus and controls. I discuss and demonstrate the difference between DIRECT SUNLIGHT and OPEN SHADE.

Audio visual link:  

Video “ Basic Digital Photography Module 2” https://youtu.be/jiDTwFmoXn8 

PDF “Basic tips for Digital Camera Users” 24MB viewed in class and emailed to students.

Assignment: 8 photos –  1- A head and shoulders photo of a person in OPEN SHADE using AUTO MODE.  2- Same subject same location using PORTRAIT MODE.  3-  Same subject in DIRECT SUNLIGHT with SPLIT LIGHTING PATTERN. Using AUTO MODE. 4- Same set up as before using PORTRAIT MODE.  5- Same set as before using P MODE WITH FLASH TURNED ON. 6- Head and shoulders portrait of a person indoors standing in front of a window with backlighting. Take the shot in AUTO MODE.  7- Same set up as before but switch to P MODE increase exposure using the MASTER EXPOSURE CONTROL. 8- Same set up as before with MASTER EXPOSURE CONTROL ON 0 and the flash turned on.   

Week 3 – Understanding what aperture, shutter and ISO settings are and how they work together to achieve exposure. This week we introduce the effects of various shutter speeds on moving subjects. We use and compare the following modes: Portrait, Night Portrait, Night Scenery, Action and Manual. 

Audio visual:

“Aperture and Shutter in P mode” https://youtu.be/qxItVcabhHw  “Digital Photography Module 3” https://youtu.be/Q9rfieIkW9U   

Assignment: 6 photos in the Motion Study series showing panning (2 shots) , tracking (2 shots), and stop action 2 shots).

Week 4 – How aperture controls Depth of Field.  In this meeting we review exposure controls and how they relate. Then we delve deeper into the effects of aperture on the final image result. Effects of zoom lens operation is discussed.

Audio visual: “Lecture Digital 1 APERTURE” https://youtu.be/r4xFrjPQVTU   “Depth of Field in ‘A’ Mode”  https://youtu.be/CX8_1RKNKcU 

Assignment: 4 shots total: Camera in the A mode for all shots. Object filling the frame with lens in 18mm focal length. Shoot at widest aperture and at f/22.  Change focal length to 55mm and frame photo so object is at the same size and framing as previous shot. Shoot wide open and at f/22.

Week 5 – Composition – an overview. We examine the rule of thirds and the Fibonacci Grid. Patterns, Symmetry and Asymmetry are discussed and demonstrated. Students are directed to change their camera option so the grid appears in the finder.

Audio visual:

“Pattern and Symmetry and Assignment” https://youtu.be/bib8EhPoz54 

“Fibonacci Grid and Assignment” https://youtu.be/t9LWi50YZDk 

Assignment: 6 shots  1- Symmetrical image. 2- Change composition to create Asymmetrical image. 3- Asymmetrical with new subject. Shots 4,5,6 Employing the Fibonacci grid to create pleasing compositions.

 

 Week 6 – Introduction to Macro Photography and Associated Lighting Solutions. Using the close up filters that we purchased, we will be taking several close ups with each of the 4 diopters. We will be adding light with our flashlights to see the effects of controlled illumination on close up subjects.  

Audio Visual: “Intro to Macro Photography”  https://youtu.be/549gAq9iJ0Y  

Assignments: 6 Shots as described in the video.  

 

Week 7- Exploration of Lighting Properties

Week 8- Basic Portrait Lighting Patterns

In this week we learn the 5 basic portrait lighting patterns used by all studios and movie lighting directors.

Audio Visual: https://youtu.be/UMBUlTvpyHk

Lecture Visuals:

Part 1- https://youtu.be/BLwJxvDubho

Part 2: https://youtu.be/ufBy_9JKPqE

Part 3: https://youtu.be/iBlx38IFDss

 

Week 9- Application of Portrait Concepts

Expanding upon the 5 basic lighting patterns, we add a RIM LIGHT to the lighting scheme.

Audio Visual: https://youtu.be/r5GjYI_o9bA

Assignment: Included in the video (5 lighting patterns with rim light added)

Week 10- Photography of Hands With a Product or Other Object

Week 11- Landscape Photography

Week 12- Architectural Photography

Week 13- Light Painting

Week 14- Review of Class Concepts and Catch Up Shooting

Week 14- Portfolio – Application of Concepts

Week 15- Portfolio- Shooting

Week 16- Portfolio Submission and Review

Week 17- Final Critique

 

 

College Policies

Academic dishonesty, plagiarism and behavior.

Columbia College maintains a high standard of individual student academic achievement by strictly enforcing the rules against modes of disruptive conduct, plagiarizing the work of others, dishonesty, stealing, collusion to commit acts of academic crimes such as doing work for others outside of the bounds of group assignments, selling or trading work with other students for the benefit of grading, treating fellow students in a disrespectful manner or any other action that makes others uncomfortable.

 

Unacceptable behavior also includes eating in class, dominating classroom discussions, failure to respect the rights of others to participate in class activities or express themselves, talking in class during lectures, inattentiveness such as using the computer or a cell phone for unrelated tasks during lectures, excessive demands for attention of teacher’s time for the review of material covered in class, and any other behavior that impedes the progress of the class.

 

In the process of learning the craft of photography, there is an acceptable range of copying techniques and shot content that would be plagiarism in the workplace, but is acceptable learning behavior in the context of the classroom. Any questions concerning these topics should be discussed with the instructor for clarification.

 

We strive to provide a welcoming and safe learning environment for all students. If you feel that you are the victim of any improper or coercive behavior by a teacher or student you should report the actions to school authorities at once. Silence does not help to build a healthy environment.

 

Absences

Participation in class lectures and labs is a significant portion of the grade. While a student may benefit from viewing the online materials associated with the class and complete many of the assignments while missing class meetings, frequent absences will be grounds for dropping a student. This course of study involves many hands-on tasks that need to be supervised by the instructor for the best outcome. If a student is unable to attend several classes due to illness or personal reasons, he/she should contact the instructor to discuss the situation.

 

Class progress and pacing

The class is designed to progress at a steady pace, allowing for every student that applies him/herself to stay current. As in the case of all skills, each exercise builds upon the previous one in order to achieve mastery. If a student misses a class or fails to complete the required assignment in sequence, the result will be a failure to achieve the goals of the student learning outcome (SLO).  I will work with students in the final lab hour to support them in their efforts to catch up with assignments or review concepts and previous lessons. It is my job to help all students to get the maximum benefit from the course, but instructors are not able or required to supply students with an unreasonable level of assistance. Students are expected to apply themselves, attend class, and do their best to complete the work. Effort is a key component of learning and it will be rewarded in this course, and in life!

 

Class assignments

We will do the class assignments involving technical skills in the lab following the lecture. This is important so students do the work under my direction and display an understanding of the specific camera handling concept. It also enables the students to ask questions, have me view the results, and ‘work out the kinks’. While it is possible to pass the class by turning in the exercises done during the lab time, a grade higher than a C can only be achieved by using the acquired skills to do artistic versions of the assignments on your own time. ANY ASSIGNMENT MAY BE REDONE FOR A HIGHER GRADE UP UNTIL WEEK 15 OF THE CLASS. I encourage redos.

 

Submission of student work

It is important for students to submit photos in a digital file format that can be easily viewed by the instructor and projected in class. It is equally important for the photo files to be properly labeled with the assignment name to prevent confusion or excessive time needed to sort them out. The preferred format is JPEG sized to about 2 megabytes. I encourage the use of PowerPoint, as that application is ideal for displaying the assignment title on the same screen as the photo.

 

Late assignments

Each assignment is due 2 weeks after it is given, although earlier submissions are welcome because they are useful in the class critiques. Assignments that are turned in late will be lowered a full grade point. In the business world, a late photo that misses the deadline is often rejected and unpaid. This is particularly true in the production of printed materials. In the digital world, a mediocre submission can be updated. Such is the case in this class. It is better to submit the photo exercises from a lab session than suffer the consequences of a late assignment. Any assignment can be redone for an A up until week 15, but a late assignment can only be raised to a B.

 

Grading system

Most assignments require two or more photo submissions. The value of each photo is typically 10 points unless specified otherwise. An assignment that requires 4 photos is a 40-point assignment. If the photos for a 40-point assignment are done during the lab with a satisfactory result, which displays an understanding of the technique or concept, but lacks creativity, the grade will typically be 31 points, equaling 77%. That’s a C . Higher points are possible with proper application of the technique and a unique approach to the design, composition and/or content. Clever and unique approaches to an assignment, especially when the work is done on the student’s time outside of lab, are rewarded with higher marks.

 

At week 10 we will begin work on our final portfolio. We discontinue new technical assignments at week 13 and use the lab hours to review previous assignments, catch up on late work, and critique photos for portfolio submissions.

 

Final Portfolio

The hard and fast rules about portfolio content are as follows:

• Final portfolio submissions are due no later than class meeting on WEEK 16.

• Due to time constraints on the last class meeting your portfolio may not be shown, so I encourage early submissions to gain the benefit of class critique and discussion.

• No less than 10 photos and no more than 20.

• Photos should not exceed 3 megabytes each and may be as small as 600KB.

• All portfolio shots will be a 12” x 8” horizontal frame. Vertical shots should not exceed 8” high at 300 DPI. Excess space on all images not fitting the frame should be filled with black.

• Photos must be submitted in a format that can be easily projected.

• Photos will be uploaded to a website created for the ‘Online Photo Show’.

• Each submitted photo should have ? Date and Name in a lower corner.

• Portfolio content is solely at the discretion of the student, as long as it does not contain nudity or objectionable subject matter. Discussion of portfolio content with the instructor is required to prevent any misunderstandings.

• Use the portfolio as a way to apply your acquired skills toward your area of interest.

• No more than 3 images previously submitted as assignments will be accepted as part of your portfolio.




Syllabus for ART 45 - 3292


Columbia College

CART 45 3292 Syllabus

Beginning Digital Photography

Instructor: Jeffery Luhn

 

 

Description:

An introduction to producing professional quality photographs of people, places and things, with special emphasis on nature. This course has a heavy concentration on learning the camera controls, exposure,composition, and technical application to produce artistic results. Instruction includes lecture, demonstration, and visits to nearby locations of interest for students to apply their newly acquired skills to complete assignments. Students must use a digital camera. Each student will submitting at least 100 photos during the course, making the use of film too costly and slow.


Units and hours:

This is a 3-unit course. The hours are assigned as follows:

Weekly 2-hour lecture         36hours

Weekly 3-hour lab                54hours

Out-of-class hours                 72 hours

Total hours                            162

 

Learning Objectives

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:

• Operate a digital camera by utilizing all of the critical controls and menu items for desired effect.

• Successfully complete the camera handling and artistic assignments in order to demonstrate a level of competency required to perform commercial tasks.

• Analyze photographs and other artworks with a critical eye, thereby benefiting from their technique, concept, and content.

• Learn the process of improvement by applying critical thinking skills gained in assignments, group critique sessions and self-evaluation.

• Gain an understanding of how photographic abilities can be integrated into student skill sets for personal enrichment and employment.

• Display competency in the direction of human subjects, placement of inanimate objects, and selection of various camera angles to achieve unique images.

• Insure that students understand basic lighting properties and principles

 

Student Evaluation

Evaluation will be divided on the following criteria:

60% Assignment submissions

20% Participation in class discussions and lab activities

20% Submission of final portfolio

 

Student Learning Outcomes

• Apply camera handling skills and use of design and composition for the creation of high quality images for artistic and commercial purposes.

• Recognize specific attributes of photographs and be able to identify and duplicate the techniques required to achieve similar results.

• Demonstrate an understanding of the various qualities of light including color temperature, direct and diffused lighting, and the ways to control the light with modifiers.

• Capture high quality images of action such as sports, weddings, general events, wildlife, performances and other one-time occurrences with reliable and repeatable results.

• Prosecute the role of photographer for group and personal projects including, but not limited to, website development, catalog shooting, architectural images, portraits, journalism, general documentation, and artistic expression.

 

Course Content Overview

•Study and use of digital photographic tools including in-depth camera operation for the controlled capture of images under various lighting and environmental conditions.

• Mastering the effects of camera controls on depth-of-field, interpretation of moving subjects through shutter speeds, color balance, and image quality.

• Achieving properly exposed images through the process of exposure control, image review, and immediate reshooting for desired effect.

• Familiarization of camera optics and the role they play in altering perspective, subject magnification, and practical usage.

• Application of design and composition principles involving camera angle and subject placement, in both natural and controlled environments.

• Historical and current trends, language, aesthetics and the use of photography in emerging media.

• Evaluation and critique of photographic images utilizing relevant terminology and concepts.

• Being able to present student work and explain the methods used as they apply to the assignments. 

• Achieving a professional level of self-evaluation and acceptance of outside critique to promote a life-long process of improving the quality of work. 

 

Assignment schedule:

All assignments must be submitted through email. They are due by Thursday at noon before the next class meeting. Most assignments can be done during the lab period following the lecture.

 

Assignment format:

The assignments must be formatted into a PowerPoint slideshow and labeled in a specific way, as outlined by the instructor. This methodwill be covered in the first meeting.

 

Equipment required:

Credit students must use a digital camera.  A DSLR model or a post 2014 mirrorless model with interchangeable lenses is preferred.

 

Syllabus Course Content:

 

Week 1: Introduction and goals of the class.

Lecture 1: Basic Digital Photography Module 1

Concept: The Power of Light

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj0Inwaa7Pc

Lecture 2: Method for assignment submission.

Video link:

 

Assignment Week 1:To be done in the lab under direction of the instructor. Students will produce a photograph of themselves on a digital camera, put it into a PowerPoint format, and email it to the instructor before the end of class. Basic instruction on PowerPoint will be included in this lab.


Week 2: Aperture and Shutter in P mode

Video link: https://youtu.be/qxItVcabhHw

Assignments: Shutter stop action (Motion 1,2,3)

 

Week 3: Depth ofField in A mode

DOF Assignments 1,2,3,4

Video link lecture: https://vimeo.com/256853531

Video link assignment: https://vimeo.com/256643634

 

Week 4: Lecture and FIELD TRIP To COLUMBIA STATE PARK (weather permitting)

Exposure and Using Reflectors (9 photos required)

Exposure assignment: 3 shots required. Use the MASTER EXPOSURE CONTROL to produce 1- Backlit under exposed  2- Backlit normal exposed  3- Backlit over exposed

Reflector assignment: 6 shots required.

 

Week 5: Lecture on Flash Fill

Assignment: 10 photos required .  Students will do a series of shots underspecific lighting conditions with and without flash. Photos must be put ontoone PowerPoint page with formatting and labeling as shown in the example. This can be completed during the lab session.

 

Week 6: Design and composition (FIELD TRIP TO LOGGING MUSEUM IN ARNOLD)

Assignment: Produce 2 shots. Shot 1 shows Symmetry.  Shot 2 shows Asymmetry

Put the shots side by side on one PowerPoint page.

Video Link Symmetry/Asymmetry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bib8EhPoz54

 

Week 7: Composition and Intro to Macro Photography

Using the Fibinnocci Grid

Assignment1: Produce 1 photo that uses the Fibinnocci guide in your macro composition. Submit the photo with the Fibinocci grid superimposed over the shot

Video link Fibinnocci: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9LWi50YZDk

 

Macro Assignments 6 Photos required

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=549gAq9iJ0Y

 

Week 8: Portraiture– an introduction to the 5 basic patterns

Assignments 1,2,3,4,5

Video link 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLwJxvDubho

Video link 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufBy_9JKPqE

Video link 3 Pattern Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMBUlTvpyHk

 

Week 9: ArchitecturalShooting  (FIELD TRIP TO JAMESTOWN)

Interiors and exteriors

Assignments 1,2,3

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPtrN_6i3r0&t=9s

 

Week 10: Applied principles of design and composition

Nature and/or Food Photography assignment 1,2,3

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNqThVETBt0

 

Week 11: Stop action using strobes

Lecture on Doc Edgerton Techniques

Assignments 1,2,3

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDFZvDor3QU&t=50s

 

Week 12: Applied principles of camera handling skills

Action, performance, or staged activity

Assignments 1,2,3

 

Week 13: LightPainting, Color to Black and White Conversion

Assignment: 1

Video link light painting: https://vimeo.com/189560396

Video link light painting 2: https://vimeo.com/63554522

Video link: B&W conversion: https://vimeo.com/213039630

Video link 2: B&W Conversion  https://vimeo.com/108863508

 

Week 14: Application of design and composition

Employing composition on location Field Trip  (Location TBD)

Assignments 1,2,3,4

 

Week 15: Makingup and redoing assignments

Building the portfolio. Showing progress in critique.

Students meet with instructor individually for progress assessment

 

Week 16:Photographing hands, Progress Assessment

Extra credit opportunity – assignment 1,2,3

Students meet with instructor individually for progress assessment

 

Week 17:Portfolio Presentation

Students present their work and discuss their challenges and successes

Private meetings with instructor to receive grades.


 College Policies

Academic dishonesty, plagiarism and behavior.

Columbia College maintains a high standard of individual student academic achievement by strictly enforcing the rules against modes of disruptive conduct, plagiarizing the work of others, dishonesty, stealing, collusion to commit acts of academic crimes such as doing work for others outside of the bounds of group assignments, selling or trading work with other students for the benefit of grading, treating fellow students in a disrespectful manner or any other action that makes others uncomfortable.

 

Unacceptable behavior also includes eating in class, dominating classroom discussions, failure to respect the rights of others to participate in class activities or express themselves, talking in class during lectures, inattentiveness such as using the computer or a cell phone for unrelated tasks during lectures, excessive demands for attention of teacher’s time for the review of material covered in class, and any other behavior that impedes the progress of the class.

 

In the process of learning the craft of photography, there is an acceptable range of copying techniques and shot content that would be plagiarism in the workplace, but is acceptable learning behavior in the context of the classroom. Any questions concerning these topics should be discussed with the instructor for clarification.

 

We strive to provide a welcoming and safe learning environment for all students. If you feel that you are the victim of any improper or coercive behavior by a teacher or student you should report the actions to school authorities at once. Silence does not help to build a healthy environment.

 

Absences

Participation in class lectures and labs is a significant portion of the grade. While a student may benefit from viewing the online materials associated with the class and complete many of the assignments while missing class meetings, frequent absences will be grounds for dropping a student. This course of study involves many hands-on tasks that need to be supervised by the instructor for the best outcome. If a student is unable to attend several classes due to illness or personal reasons, he/she should contact the instructor to discuss the situation.

 

Class progress and pacing

The class is designed to progress at a steady pace, allowing for every student that applies him/herself to stay current. As in the case of all skills, each exercise builds upon the previous one in order to achieve mastery. If a student misses a class or fails to complete the required assignment in sequence, the result will be a failure to achieve the goals of the student learning outcome (SLO).  I will work with students in the final lab hour to support them in their efforts to catch up with assignments or review concepts and previous lessons. It is my job to help all students to get the maximum benefit from the course, but instructors are not able or required to supply students with an unreasonable level of assistance. Students are expected to apply themselves, attend class, and do their best to complete the work. Effort is a key component of learning and it will be rewarded in this course, and in life!

 

Class assignments

We will do the class assignments involving technical skills in the lab following the lecture. This is important so students do the work under my direction and display an understanding of the specific camera handling concept. It also enables the students to ask questions, have me view the results, and ‘work out the kinks’. While it is possible to pass the class by turning in the exercises done during the lab time, a grade higher than a C can only be achieved by using the acquired skills to do artistic versions of the assignments on your own time. ANY ASSIGNMENT MAY BE REDONE FOR A HIGHER GRADE UP UNTIL WEEK 15 OF THE CLASS. I encourage redos.

 

Submission of student work

It is important for students to submit photos in a digital file format that can be easily viewed by the instructor and projected in class. It is equally important for the photo files to be properly labeled with the assignment name to prevent confusion or excessive time needed to sort them out. The preferred format is JPEG sized to about 2 megabytes. I encourage the use of PowerPoint, as that application is ideal for displaying the assignment title on the same screen as the photo.

 

Late assignments

Each assignment is due 1 week after it is given, although earlier submissions are welcome because they are useful in the class critiques. Assignments that are turned in late will be lowered a full grade point. In the business world, a late photo that misses the deadline is often rejected and unpaid. This is particularly true in the production of printed materials. In the digital world, a mediocre submission can be updated. Such is the case in this class. It is better to submit the photo exercises from a lab session than suffer the consequences of a late assignment. Any assignment can be redone for an A up until week 14, but a late assignment can only be raised to a B.

 

Grading system

Most assignments require two or more photo submissions. The value of each photo is typically 10 points unless specified otherwise. An assignment that requires 4 photos is a 40-point assignment. If the photos for a 40-point assignment are done during the lab with a satisfactory result, which displays an understanding of the technique or concept, but lacks creativity, the grade will typically be 31 points, equaling 77%. That’s a C . Higher points are possible with proper application of the technique and a unique approach to the design, composition and/or content. Clever and unique approaches to an assignment, especially when the work is done on the student’s time outside of lab, are rewarded with higher marks.

 

At week 10 we will begin work on our final portfolio. We discontinue new technical assignments at week 13 and use the lab hours to review previous assignments, catch up on late work, and critique photos for portfolio submissions.

 

Final Portfolio

The hard and fast rules about portfolio content are as follows:

• Final portfolio submissions are due no later than class meeting on WEEK 15.

• Due to time constraints on the last class meeting your portfolio may not be shown, so I encourage early submissions to gain the benefit of class critique and discussion.

• No less than 10 photos and no more than 20.

• Photos should not exceed 3 megabytes each and may be as small as 600KB.

• All portfolio shots will be a 12” x 8” horizontal frame. Vertical shots should not exceed 8” high at 300 DPI. Excess space on all images not fitting the frame should be filled with black.

• Photos must be submitted in a format that can be easily projected.

• Photos will be uploaded to a website created for the ‘Online Photo Show’.

• Each submitted photo should have ? Date and Name in a lower corner.

• Portfolio content is solely at the discretion of the student, as long as it does not contain nudity or objectionable subject matter. Discussion of portfolio content with the instructor is required to prevent any misunderstandings.

• Use the portfolio as a way to apply your acquired skills toward your area of interest.

• No more than 3 images previously submitted as assignments will be accepted as part of your portfolio.


ART 49 Intermediate Digital Photography

Description: 3 units Recommended for Success: ART 45 or equivalent.

36 Lecture Hours, 54 Laboratory Hours, 72 Out-of-Class Hours = 162 Total Student Learning Hours

Various field- and studio-oriented topics related to nature photography which may include but are not limited to learning to tell a story photographically, and editing and creating mockup book layouts. Students will also learn to identify and work on their own personal vision as it relates to photography. Students will do a series of assignments, learn picture editing, create and critique picture layouts and learn how to plan detailed photographic coverage. Not repeatable. Transfer: (CSU)

 

Learning Objectives

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:

• Operate a digital camera by utilizing all of the critical controls and menu items for desired effect.

• Successfully complete the camera handling and artistic assignments in order to demonstrate a level of competency required to perform commercial tasks.

• Learn the basic Photoshop skills to be able to retouch, alter color, sharpen, blur, understand layers for combining photo elements, and other tasks.

• Be able to format assignments according to course requirements and submit them using Canvas.

• Analyze photographs and other artworks with a critical eye, thereby benefiting from their technique, concept, and content.

• Learn the process of improvement by applying critical thinking skills gained in assignments, group critique sessions and self-evaluation.

• Gain an understanding of how photographic abilities can be integrated into student skill sets for personal enrichment and employment.

• Display competency in the direction of human subjects, placement of inanimate objects, and selection of various camera angles to achieve unique images.

• Insure that students understand basic lighting properties and principles

 

Student Evaluation

Evaluation will be divided on the following criteria:

60% Assignment submissions

20% Participation in class discussions and lab activities

20% Submission of final portfolio

 

Student Learning Outcomes

• Apply camera handling skills and use of design and composition for the creation of high quality images for artistic and commercial purposes.

• Recognize specific attributes of photographs and be able to identify and duplicate the techniques required to achieve similar results.

• Demonstrate an understanding of the various qualities of light including color temperature, direct and diffused lighting, and the ways to control the light with modifiers.

• Capture high quality images of action such as sports, weddings, general events, wildlife, performances and other one-time occurrences with reliable and repeatable results.

• Use Photoshop, PowerPoint, and Canvas at a level of competency acceptable to employers and web developers.

• Prosecute the role of photographer for group and personal projects including, but not limited to, website development, catalog shooting, architectural images, portraits, journalism, general documentation, and artistic expression.

 

Course Content Overview

• Master the basics of PowerPoint, Photoshop, and Canvas for the creation, preparation, and submission of assignments.

•Study and use of digital photographic tools including in-depth camera operation for the controlled capture of images under various lighting and environmental conditions.

• Mastering the effects of camera controls on depth-of-field, interpretation of moving subjects through shutter speeds, color balance, and image quality.

• Achieving properly exposed images through the process of exposure control, image review, and immediate reshooting for desired effect.

• Familiarization of camera optics and the role they play in altering perspective, subject magnification, and practical usage.

• Application of design and composition principles involving camera angle and subject placement, in both natural and controlled environments.

• Historical and current trends, language, aesthetics and the use of photography in emerging media.

• Evaluation and critique of photographic images utilizing relevant terminology and concepts.

• Being able to present student work and explain the methods used as they apply to the assignments. 

• Achieving a professional level of self-evaluation and acceptance of outside critique to promote a life-long process of improving the quality of work. 

 

Course Content Specifics

Week 1 – Formatting and submitting assignments. Covering the syllabus, discussing expected student outcomes, discussing workload management, submission methods and equipment requirements.

 

Details: It is essential for students to format, label and name each assignment properly prior to submitting them. This insures that student work is ready to show in class for critique sessions, be graded and filed for future reference. We will use Microsoft PowerPoint for the purpose of formatting the work.  Maximum file size: 3 MB  Note: Mislabeled assignments delay the class and may result in lowered student grades.

Once we have the assignment completed in PowerPoint, we will be submitting it through the Canvas portal. We will have a tutorial on the use of Canvas after the lunch break on the first day. PLEASE ATTEND!!

 

Assignment: Our first assignment will be a labeled “Self-portrait”, which we will produce and submit during class.  There will be no homework in week 1.

 

Video about how to label and submit assignments will be made available:


 

Additional videos for recommended viewing:

 “Intro Lecture” https://youtu.be/Hj0Inwaa7Pc   

“Camera Basics Module 1” https://youtu.be/BsgGjutkqb4  

 

Week 2 - Photoshop intro and lesson.

 

The official course description for Intermediate Field Photography ART 49 includes this sentence, “learn picture editing, create and critique picture layouts.”  While PowerPoint is good for submitting assignments, it is not a powerful editing application. We must gain a working knowledge of Phototshop for editing. In week 2 we will learn to set up file sizes, crop, make basic color corrections and accomplish B&W conversion. Students may use any photo from their camera for this assignment, or shoot a new image in class. We will do this assignment and submit it during class.

 

Details of file size: You will work in high resolution. 8.25” tall x 12” wide JPEG  300p (pixals per inch) This resolution is TOO BIG to send by email. You will SAVE AS a lower resolution for submission. See below.

 

Assignment: Turn in a B&W photo with name printed on image. File size: MUST BE JPEG!!! File size must not exceed 3MB! 

 

Video for in depth B&W conversion: https://vimeo.com/manage/108863508/general

 

Week 3 - Photoshop retouching basics. File conversion from PS to JPEG.

 

“Every image can be improved in Photoshop.” To that end, it’s essential that digital photographers learn basic photo retouching and image manipulation. This week we’ll be doing two Photoshop assignments:

1-     Merging two photos so the same person is shown twice in the scene. We will shoot these two images in class. Label “Photo Merge – your name”

2-     2- Retouching a damaged photo with cracks and tears. Students may bring in an old damaged photo, or use one supplied by the instructor.  Label “Photo Retouch – your name”

Assignment submission: Separate JPEG files.   8.25” tall x 12” wide JPEG   Reduce resolution to get each photo under 3MB. 

 

Photo Merge blog link: http://luhnphoto.com/shooting-tips-gathering-photo-assets/

 

 

Week 4 – Lighting Control for Photojournalism

This assignment requires three finished photos. Students are required to control sunlight by using a reflector and a diffuser. The preferred subject matter for this assignment is a person or persons doing a task. The goal is to make the best possible shot in three different lighting situations.

 

Composition is an important element of this assignment. Positioning the model so that no distracting elements are present will yield the best results. A wide aperture is recommended to reduce depth of field.

 

We will discuss the expected outcomes in class and demonstrate the techniques and equipment required.  The end result is expected to be a quality trio of images suitable for publication. These are the three lighting approaches:

1-Direct sun

2 - w/reflector

3 - with diffuser (or soft side lighting from a north facing window.

 

Submission requirements: Three vertical images on one screen.  Powerpoint is the preferred application for this. Label your assignment: “Triptic – Your Name”

 

Week 5 – First Picture Story Assignment

The official description of this course includes, “learning to tell a story photographically, and editing and creating mockup book layouts.”

Pursuant to this end, students will be required to shoot the first of two picture stories required for this course. (The second story will be the final assignment and will be discussed later.) As in the case of most commercial photojournalistic assignments “Story 1” has specific requirements. Seven photos are required for this story assignment. Each page can have up to 3 photos. Each photo must have a one-sentence caption.

 

Additional text may be added to each page, as it would be in a newspaper or magazine format. Total text not to exceed 250 words. Additionally, this picture story can only include subjects that look like they predate 1950. The photos must be sepia toned. For additional effect in subjects that are quite old, I recommend that you ‘distress’ the images in Photoshop. See this link for a detailed tutorial about converting to sepia:

 

INSERT SEPIA CONVERSION LINK HERE https://vimeo.com/manage/213037906/general

 

See this link for an article about distressing a photo to make it look old: http://luhnphoto.com/soldiers-shot-my-brother-how-to-produce-instant-ancestors/

 

Subject choice is wide open. It could be a mock family album, a walk through the woods, a visit to Columbia, a series of still life shots, an editorial article about a person, a cooking lesson, the oldest person you know holding their favorite small possessions, etc. Shots with people don’t necessarily have to show their face. Make your story engaging! Let’s talk about your story idea before you get started. Class members are encouraged to offer constructive input!

 

Format: PowerPoint with a total file size not exceeding 3MB. Maximum 8 pages. All photos to be sepia colored.

Due date: This assignment is DUE AT 1PM NEXT FRIDAY so we can upload the project and view it before the end of class. Students will have from 9:40AM to 1PM next Friday to work in class to complete the assignment if needed.

 

See this video to learn how to make page layouts in Photoshop. Note: The advantage to using Photoshop for page layouts is the ability to ad drop shadows, create discrete layers, insert page backgrounds, etc. Using Photoshop is not a requirement for the page layout of this assignment. You can do it in PowerPoint. But you will need Photoshop to convert the photos into Sepia and make them look old by distressing them.   https://vimeo.com/manage/185748663/general

 

 

Week 6- Basic Portrait Lighting Pattern Review

In this week we learn/review the 5 basic portrait lighting patterns used by all studios and movie lighting directors.

Audio Visual: https://youtu.be/UMBUlTvpyHk

Lecture Visuals:

Part 1- https://youtu.be/BLwJxvDubho

Part 2: https://youtu.be/ufBy_9JKPqE

Part 3: https://youtu.be/iBlx38IFDss

 

Week 7- Producing Photos of Actors and or Musicians – Field trip to Columbia State Park

We will be photographing local actors in costume for them to use in their self-promotion and upcoming performances. This is provided that I can get some actors from the Sierra Stage Company or other drama group. I’m working on it.

 

Our goal is to choose locations with good backgrounds and flattering lighting. I will provide diagrams of poses for you to use. There will be 8 photos required for this assignment. No subject may appear more than 3 times in any photo. You may do group shots, but they only count as one image. You are required to send all your best photos to the models. It is your responsibility to get their email addresses.

 

Week 8-  Macro Assignment

Using the close up filters that we purchased, or your macro lens, we will be taking several extreme close ups. We will be adding light with our flashlights, where appropriate, to see the effects of controlled illumination on close up subjects.  

Audio Visual: “Intro to Macro Photography”  https://youtu.be/549gAq9iJ0Y  

Assignments: 6 Shots as described in the video.  

 

 

Week 9- Restaurant food assignment

We will be shooting in the culinary department at the school. This will require you to use auxiliary lighting. A powerful LED flashlight will be required for this assignment.

There will be 6 photos required: 2 shots of chef working, 2 close ups of hands preparing food, 2 shots of finished food dishes. You must send your photos to the culinary instructor in addition to submitting them for class critique.

 

Week 10- Presentation of Your Final Grade Picture Story to Class

In this class meeting, students will present their ideas for their final project. Students will need a shot list, location notes, and simple page layout sketches. Treat this presentation as a ‘pitch to a publisher’. Students must address these points in writing and present them to the class:

1-     Is your picture story for news, education, political, science, entertainment, or other purpose?

2-     Reason why your picture story deserves publication.

3-     Justify your project by showing similar picture stories that have been published.

4-     List of publications that would be interested in publishing your photo story.

5-     Budget for your project.

6-     Materials you’ll need to assemble.

7-     Discuss the main challenges you’ll face and how you will deal with them.

For large scale projects, students may choose to work in teams of 2 or 3.  For single students the final picture story shall include no less than 16 and no more than 20 photos. For group teams the final project must include no less than 20 and no more than 28 photos.

 

Week 11- Field trip. Location to be determined.

Week 13- Light Painting techniques demonstrated. Light painting assignment.

Week 14- Review of Class Concepts and Catch Up Shooting. Photoshop tutoring.

Week 15- Submission and critique of make up assignments and extra credit

Week 16- Presentation of Final Projects – 1st half of class

Week 17- Presentation of Final Projects – 2nd half of class

 

 

College Policies

Academic dishonesty, plagiarism and behavior.

Columbia College maintains a high standard of individual student academic achievement by strictly enforcing the rules against modes of disruptive conduct, plagiarizing the work of others, dishonesty, stealing, collusion to commit acts of academic crimes such as doing work for others outside of the bounds of group assignments, selling or trading work with other students for the benefit of grading, treating fellow students in a disrespectful manner or any other action that makes others uncomfortable.

 

Unacceptable behavior also includes eating in class, dominating classroom discussions, failure to respect the rights of others to participate in class activities or express themselves, talking in class during lectures, inattentiveness such as using the computer or a cell phone for unrelated tasks during lectures, excessive demands for attention of teacher’s time for the review of material covered in class, and any other behavior that impedes the progress of the class.

 

In the process of learning the craft of photography, there is an acceptable range of copying techniques and shot content that would be plagiarism in the workplace, but is acceptable learning behavior in the context of the classroom. Any questions concerning these topics should be discussed with the instructor for clarification.

 

We strive to provide a welcoming and safe learning environment for all students. If you feel that you are the victim of any improper or coercive behavior by a teacher or student you should report the actions to school authorities at once. Silence does not help to build a healthy environment.

 

Absences

Participation in class lectures and labs is a significant portion of the grade. While a student may benefit from viewing the online materials associated with the class and complete many of the assignments while missing class meetings, frequent absences will be grounds for dropping a student. This course of study involves many hands-on tasks that need to be supervised by the instructor for the best outcome. If a student is unable to attend several classes due to illness or personal reasons, he/she should contact the instructor to discuss the situation.

 

Class progress and pacing

The class is designed to progress at a steady pace, allowing for every student that applies him/herself to stay current. As in the case of all skills, each exercise builds upon the previous one in order to achieve mastery. If a student misses a class or fails to complete the required assignment in sequence, the result will be a failure to achieve the goals of the student learning outcome (SLO).  I will work with students in the final lab hour to support them in their efforts to catch up with assignments or review concepts and previous lessons. It is my job to help all students to get the maximum benefit from the course, but instructors are not able or required to supply students with an unreasonable level of assistance. Students are expected to apply themselves, attend class, and do their best to complete the work. Effort is a key component of learning and it will be rewarded in this course, and in life!

 

Class assignments

We will do the class assignments involving technical skills in the lab following the lecture. This is important so students do the work under my direction and display an understanding of the specific camera handling concept. It also enables the students to ask questions, have me view the results, and ‘work out the kinks’. While it is possible to pass the class by turning in the exercises done during the lab time, a grade higher than a C can only be achieved by using the acquired skills to do artistic versions of the assignments on your own time. ANY ASSIGNMENT MAY BE REDONE FOR A HIGHER GRADE UP UNTIL WEEK 15 OF THE CLASS. I encourage redos.

 

Submission of student work

It is important for students to submit photos in a digital file format that can be easily viewed by the instructor and projected in class. It is equally important for the photo files to be properly labeled with the assignment name to prevent confusion or excessive time needed to sort them out. The preferred format is JPEG sized to about 2 megabytes. I encourage the use of PowerPoint, as that application is ideal for displaying the assignment title on the same screen as the photo.

 

Late assignments

Each assignment is due the following week after it is given, although earlier submissions are welcome because they are useful in the class critiques. Assignments that are turned in late will be lowered a full grade point. In the business world, a late photo that misses the deadline is often rejected and unpaid. This is particularly true in the production of printed materials. In the digital world, a mediocre submission can be updated. Such is the case in this class. It is better to submit the photo exercises from a lab session than suffer the consequences of a late assignment. Any assignment can be redone for an A up until week 15, but a late assignment can only be raised to a B.

 

Grading system

Most assignments require two or more photo submissions. The value of each photo will vary depending upon difficulty. Extra points are possible with proper application of the technique and a unique approach to the design, composition and/or content. Clever and unique approaches to an assignment, especially when the work is done on the student’s time outside of lab, are rewarded with higher marks.

 

At week 10 we will begin work on our final portfolio. We discontinue new technical assignments at week 13 and use the lab hours to review previous assignments, catch up on late work, and critique photos for portfolio submissions.

 

Final Portfolio

The hard and fast rules about portfolio content are as follows:

• Final portfolio submissions are due no later than class meeting on WEEK 16.

• Due to time constraints on the last class meeting your portfolio may not be shown, so I encourage early submissions to gain the benefit of class critique and discussion.

• No less than 10 photos and no more than 20.

• Photos should not exceed 3 megabytes each and may be as small as 600KB.

• All portfolio shots will be a 12” x 8” horizontal frame. Vertical shots should not exceed 8” high at 300 DPI. Excess space on all images not fitting the frame should be filled with black.

• Photos must be submitted in a format that can be easily projected.

• Photos will be uploaded to a website created for the ‘Online Photo Show’.

• Each submitted photo should have ? Date and Name in a lower corner.

• Portfolio content is solely at the discretion of the student, as long as it does not contain nudity or objectionable subject matter. Discussion of portfolio content with the instructor is required to prevent any misunderstandings.

• Use the portfolio as a way to apply your acquired skills toward your area of interest.

• No more than 3 images previously submitted as assignments will be accepted as part of your portfolio.




Syllabus for ART 45 - 3292

 

Columbia College

CART 45 3292 Syllabus

Beginning Digital Photography

Instructor: Jeffery Luhn

 

 

Description:

An introduction to producing professional quality photographs of people, places and things, with special emphasis on nature. This course has a heavy concentration on learning the camera controls, exposure,composition, and technical application to produce artistic results. Instruction includes lecture, demonstration, and visits to nearby locations of interest for students to apply their newly acquired skills to complete assignments. Students must use a digital camera. Each student will submitting at least 100 photos during the course, making the use of film too costly and slow.

 

Units and hours:

This is a 3-unit course. The hours are assigned as follows:

Weekly 2-hour lecture         36hours

Weekly 3-hour lab                54hours

Out-of-class hours                 72 hours

Total hours                            162

 

Learning Objectives

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to:

• Operate a digital camera by utilizing all of the critical controls and menu items for desired effect.

• Successfully complete the camera handling and artistic assignments in order to demonstrate a level of competency required to perform commercial tasks.

• Analyze photographs and other artworks with a critical eye, thereby benefiting from their technique, concept, and content.

• Learn the process of improvement by applying critical thinking skills gained in assignments, group critique sessions and self-evaluation.

• Gain an understanding of how photographic abilities can be integrated into student skill sets for personal enrichment and employment.

• Display competency in the direction of human subjects, placement of inanimate objects, and selection of various camera angles to achieve unique images.

• Insure that students understand basic lighting properties and principles

 

Student Evaluation

Evaluation will be divided on the following criteria:

60% Assignment submissions

20% Participation in class discussions and lab activities

20% Submission of final portfolio

 

Student Learning Outcomes

• Apply camera handling skills and use of design and composition for the creation of high quality images for artistic and commercial purposes.

• Recognize specific attributes of photographs and be able to identify and duplicate the techniques required to achieve similar results.

• Demonstrate an understanding of the various qualities of light including color temperature, direct and diffused lighting, and the ways to control the light with modifiers.

• Capture high quality images of action such as sports, weddings, general events, wildlife, performances and other one-time occurrences with reliable and repeatable results.

• Prosecute the role of photographer for group and personal projects including, but not limited to, website development, catalog shooting, architectural images, portraits, journalism, general documentation, and artistic expression.

 

Course Content Overview

•Study and use of digital photographic tools including in-depth camera operation for the controlled capture of images under various lighting and environmental conditions.

• Mastering the effects of camera controls on depth-of-field, interpretation of moving subjects through shutter speeds, color balance, and image quality.

• Achieving properly exposed images through the process of exposure control, image review, and immediate reshooting for desired effect.

• Familiarization of camera optics and the role they play in altering perspective, subject magnification, and practical usage.

• Application of design and composition principles involving camera angle and subject placement, in both natural and controlled environments.

• Historical and current trends, language, aesthetics and the use of photography in emerging media.

• Evaluation and critique of photographic images utilizing relevant terminology and concepts.

• Being able to present student work and explain the methods used as they apply to the assignments. 

• Achieving a professional level of self-evaluation and acceptance of outside critique to promote a life-long process of improving the quality of work. 

 

Assignment schedule:

All assignments must be submitted through email. They are due by Thursday at noon before the next class meeting. Most assignments can be done during the lab period following the lecture.

 

Assignment format:

The assignments must be formatted into a PowerPoint slideshow and labeled in a specific way, as outlined by the instructor. This methodwill be covered in the first meeting.

 

Equipment required:

Credit students must use a digital camera.  A DSLR model or a post 2014 mirrorless model with interchangeable lenses is preferred.

 

Syllabus Course Content:

 

Week 1: Introduction and goals of the class.

Lecture 1: Basic Digital Photography Module 1

Concept: The Power of Light

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj0Inwaa7Pc

Lecture 2: Method for assignment submission.

Video link:

 

Assignment Week 1:To be done in the lab under direction of the instructor. Students will produce a photograph of themselves on a digital camera, put it into a PowerPointformat, and email it to the instructor before the end of class. Basic instruction on PowerPoint will be included in this lab.

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7SiF-r3GCU&t=129s

 

 

Week 2: Aperture and Shutter in P mode

Video link: https://youtu.be/qxItVcabhHw

Assignments: Shutter stop action (Motion 1,2,3)

 

Week 3: Depth ofField in A mode

DOF Assignments 1,2,3,4

Video link lecture: https://vimeo.com/256853531

Video link assignment: https://vimeo.com/256643634

 

Week 4: Lecture and FIELD TRIP To COLUMBIA STATE PARK (weather permitting)

Exposure and Using Reflectors (9 photos required)

Exposure assignment: 3 shots required. Use the MASTER EXPOSURE CONTROL to produce 1- Backlit under exposed  2- Backlit normal exposed  3- Backlit over exposed

Reflector assignment: 6 shots required.

 

Week 5: Lectureon Flash Fill

Assignment: 10 photos required .  Students will do a series of shots underspecific lighting conditions with and without flash. Photos must be put ontoone PowerPoint page with formatting and labeling as shown in the example. This can be completed during the lab session.

 

Week 6: Design and composition (FIELD TRIP TO LOGGING MUSEUM IN ARNOLD)

Assignment: Produce 2 shots. Shot 1 shows Symmetry.  Shot 2 shows Asymmetry

Put the shots side by side on one PowerPoint page.

Video Link Symmetry/Asymmetry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bib8EhPoz54

 

Week 7: Composition and Intro to Macro Photography

Using the Fibinnocci Grid

Assignment1: Produce 1 photo that uses the Fibinnocci guide in your macro composition. Submit the photo with the Fibinocci grid superimposed over the shot

Video link Fibinnocci: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9LWi50YZDk

 

Macro Assignments 6 Photos required

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=549gAq9iJ0Y

 

Week 8: Portraiture– an introduction to the 5 basic patterns

Assignments 1,2,3,4,5

Video link 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLwJxvDubho

Video link 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufBy_9JKPqE

Video link 3 Pattern Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMBUlTvpyHk

 

Week 9: ArchitecturalShooting  (FIELD TRIP TO JAMESTOWN)

Interiors and exteriors

Assignments 1,2,3

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPtrN_6i3r0&t=9s

 

Week 10: Applied principles of design and composition

Nature and/or Food Photography assignment 1,2,3

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNqThVETBt0

 

Week 11: Stop action using strobes

Lecture on Doc Edgerton Techniques

Assignments 1,2,3

Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDFZvDor3QU&t=50s

 

Week 12: Applied principles of camera handling skills

Action, performance, or staged activity

Assignments 1,2,3

 

Week 13: LightPainting, Color to Black and White Conversion

Assignment: 1

Video link light painting: https://vimeo.com/189560396

Video link light painting 2: https://vimeo.com/63554522

Video link: B&W conversion: https://vimeo.com/213039630

Video link 2: B&W Conversion  https://vimeo.com/108863508

 

Week 14: Application of design and composition

Employing composition on location Field Trip  (Location TBD)

Assignments 1,2,3,4

 

Week 15: Makingup and redoing assignments

Building the portfolio. Showing progress in critique.

Students meet with instructor individually for progress assessment

 

Week 16:Photographing hands, Progress Assessment

Extra credit opportunity – assignment 1,2,3

Students meet with instructor individually for progress assessment

 

Week 17:Portfolio Presentation

Students present their work and discuss their challenges and successes

Private meetings with instructor to receive grades.

 

 College Policies

Academic dishonesty, plagiarism and behavior.

Columbia College maintains a high standard of individual student academic achievement by strictly enforcing the rules against modes of disruptive conduct, plagiarizing the work of others, dishonesty, stealing, collusion to commit acts of academic crimes such as doing work for others outside of the bounds of group assignments, selling or trading work with other students for the benefit of grading, treating fellow students in a disrespectful manner or any other action that makes others uncomfortable.

 

Unacceptable behavior also includes eating in class, dominating classroom discussions, failure to respect the rights of others to participate in class activities or express themselves, talking in class during lectures, inattentiveness such as using the computer or a cell phone for unrelated tasks during lectures, excessive demands for attention of teacher’s time for the review of material covered in class, and any other behavior that impedes the progress of the class.

 

In the process of learning the craft of photography, there is an acceptable range of copying techniques and shot content that would be plagiarism in the workplace, but is acceptable learning behavior in the context of the classroom. Any questions concerning these topics should be discussed with the instructor for clarification.

 

We strive to provide a welcoming and safe learning environment for all students. If you feel that you are the victim of any improper or coercive behavior by a teacher or student you should report the actions to school authorities at once. Silence does not help to build a healthy environment.

 

Absences

Participation in class lectures and labs is a significant portion of the grade. While a student may benefit from viewing the online materials associated with the class and complete many of the assignments while missing class meetings, frequent absences will be grounds for dropping a student. This course of study involves many hands-on tasks that need to be supervised by the instructor for the best outcome. If a student is unable to attend several classes due to illness or personal reasons, he/she should contact the instructor to discuss the situation.

 

Class progress and pacing

The class is designed to progress at a steady pace, allowing for every student that applies him/herself to stay current. As in the case of all skills, each exercise builds upon the previous one in order to achieve mastery. If a student misses a class or fails to complete the required assignment in sequence, the result will be a failure to achieve the goals of the student learning outcome (SLO).  I will work with students in the final lab hour to support them in their efforts to catch up with assignments or review concepts and previous lessons. It is my job to help all students to get the maximum benefit from the course, but instructors are not able or required to supply students with an unreasonable level of assistance. Students are expected to apply themselves, attend class, and do their best to complete the work. Effort is a key component of learning and it will be rewarded in this course, and in life!

 

Class assignments

We will do the class assignments involving technical skills in the lab following the lecture. This is important so students do the work under my direction and display an understanding of the specific camera handling concept. It also enables the students to ask questions, have me view the results, and ‘work out the kinks’. While it is possible to pass the class by turning in the exercises done during the lab time, a grade higher than a C can only be achieved by using the acquired skills to do artistic versions of the assignments on your own time. ANY ASSIGNMENT MAY BE REDONE FOR A HIGHER GRADE UP UNTIL WEEK 15 OF THE CLASS. I encourage redos.

 

Submission of student work

It is important for students to submit photos in a digital file format that can be easily viewed by the instructor and projected in class. It is equally important for the photo files to be properly labeled with the assignment name to prevent confusion or excessive time needed to sort them out. The preferred format is JPEG sized to about 2 megabytes. I encourage the use of PowerPoint, as that application is ideal for displaying the assignment title on the same screen as the photo.

 

Late assignments

Each assignment is due 2 weeks after it is given, although earlier submissions are welcome because they are useful in the class critiques. Assignments that are turned in late will be lowered a full grade point. In the business world, a late photo that misses the deadline is often rejected and unpaid. This is particularly true in the production of printed materials. In the digital world, a mediocre submission can be updated. Such is the case in this class. It is better to submit the photo exercises from a lab session than suffer the consequences of a late assignment. Any assignment can be redone for an A up until week 15, but a late assignment can only be raised to a B.

 

Grading system

Most assignments require two or more photo submissions. The value of each photo is typically 10 points unless specified otherwise. An assignment that requires 4 photos is a 40-point assignment. If the photos for a 40-point assignment are done during the lab with a satisfactory result, which displays an understanding of the technique or concept, but lacks creativity, the grade will typically be 31 points, equaling 77%. That’s a C . Higher points are possible with proper application of the technique and a unique approach to the design, composition and/or content. Clever and unique approaches to an assignment, especially when the work is done on the student’s time outside of lab, are rewarded with higher marks.

 

At week 10 we will begin work on our final portfolio. We discontinue new technical assignments at week 13 and use the lab hours to review previous assignments, catch up on late work, and critique photos for portfolio submissions.

 

Final Portfolio

The hard and fast rules about portfolio content are as follows:

• Final portfolio submissions are due no later than class meeting on WEEK 16.

• Due to time constraints on the last class meeting your portfolio may not be shown, so I encourage early submissions to gain the benefit of class critique and discussion.

• No less than 10 photos and no more than 20.

• Photos should not exceed 3 megabytes each and may be as small as 600KB.

• All portfolio shots will be a 12” x 8” horizontal frame. Vertical shots should not exceed 8” high at 300 DPI. Excess space on all images not fitting the frame should be filled with black.

• Photos must be submitted in a format that can be easily projected.

• Photos will be uploaded to a website created for the ‘Online Photo Show’.

• Each submitted photo should have ? Date and Name in a lower corner.

• Portfolio content is solely at the discretion of the student, as long as it does not contain nudity or objectionable subject matter. Discussion of portfolio content with the instructor is required to prevent any misunderstandings.

• Use the portfolio as a way to apply your acquired skills toward your area of interest.

• No more than 3 images previously submitted as assignments will be accepted as part of your portfolio.